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Brain injury rehabilitation services

Brain injury is often caused by a trauma, such as a blow to the head. It can also be the result of a non-traumatic event, such as a brain tumor or infection. If you or someone you know has had a brain injury and are experiencing difficulties, rehabilitation can help you learn new skills and manage many of the symptoms of brain injury.

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What to expect

If you or a loved one is recovering from a brain injury, you may benefit from these services:

  • physical therapy uses exercise, heat, electrical stimulation and other methods to help people with brain injury improve their ability to move, function and heal.
  • occupational therapy helps people recovering from brain injury learn new ways to handle daily activities and develop "skills for the job of living."
  • speech therapy can help with communication and thinking problems. For example, while recovering from a brain injury you may have difficulty understanding language (aphasia) or difficulty swallowing (dysphagia).

Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute offers a number of other related services to help you in your recovery. Your therapy coordinator will be able to suggest which are right for you. Some of these include:

  • aquatic therapy
  • driver assessment and training
  • balance retraining and vestibular rehabilitation 
  • partial weight bearing gait therapy

Good to know

Patients in Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute's Brain Injury Program show excellent outcomes.

  • In 2016, more than 82 percent were able to go back to their homes or communities. That is 11 percent higher than the national average.
  • Although our patients stay in the hospital five days fewer than the national average, their daily improvement is higher.

Good for treating

Brain injury rehabilitation can help you learn new skills to manage many of the symptoms of brain injury, including:

  • paralysis
  • seizures
  • dizziness
  • coma
  • impaired vision, hearing, taste and smell
  • speech and language problems
  • spasticity
  • loss of sensation

Related links

Source: Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute
Reviewed by: Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute

First published: 8/30/2018
Last reviewed: 8/1/2018