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Factor V deficiency

Parahemophilia; Owren disease; Bleeding disorder - factor V deficiency

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Causes

Blood clotting is a complex process involving as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors.

Factor V deficiency is caused by a lack of factor V. When certain blood clotting factors are low or missing, your blood does not clot properly.

Factor V deficiency is rare. It may be caused by:

  • A defective factor V gene passed down through families (inherited)
  • An antibody that interferes with normal factor V function

You can develop an antibody that interferes with factor V:

  • After giving birth
  • After being treated with a certain type of fibrin glue
  • After surgery
  • With autoimmune diseases and certain cancers

Sometimes the cause is unknown.

The disease is similar to hemophilia, except bleeding into joints is less common. In the inherited form of factor V deficiency, a family history of a bleeding disorder is a risk factor.

Definition

Factor V deficiency is a bleeding disorder that is passed down through families. It affects the ability of the blood to clot.

Exams and Tests

Tests to detect factor V deficiency include:

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outlook is good with diagnosis and proper treatment.

Possible Complications

Severe bleeding (hemorrhage) could occur.

Support Groups

The following resources can provide more information on factor V deficiency:

Symptoms

Excessive bleeding with menstrual periods and after childbirth often occurs. Other symptoms can include:

Treatment

You will be given fresh blood plasma or fresh frozen plasma infusions during a bleeding episode or after surgery. These treatments will correct the deficiency temporarily.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Go to the emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911) if you have an unexplained or prolonged loss of blood.

Review Date: 1/19/2018
Reviewed By: Richard LoCicero, MD, private practice specializing in Hematology and Medical Oncology, Longstreet Cancer Center, Gainesville, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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