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Biopsy - polyps

Polyp biopsy

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Definition

A polyp biopsy is a test that takes a sample of, or removes polyps (abnormal growths) for examination.

How the Test is Performed

Polyps are growths of tissue that may be attached by a stalk-like structure (a pedicle). Polyps are commonly found in organs with many blood vessels. Such organs include the uterus, colon, and nose.

Some polyps are cancerous (malignant) and the cancer cells are likely to spread. Most polyps are noncancerous (benign). The most common site of polyps that are treated is the colon.

How a polyp biopsy is done depends on the location:

For areas of the body that can be seen or where the polyp can be felt, a numbing medicine is applied to the skin. Then a small piece of the tissue that appears to be abnormal is removed. This tissue is sent to a laboratory. There, it is tested to see if it is cancerous.

How the Test will Feel

For polyps on the skin surface, you may feel tugging while the biopsy sample is being taken. After the numbing medicine wears off, the area may be sore for a few days.

Biopsies of polyps inside the body are done during procedures such as EGD or colonoscopy. Usually, you will not feel anything during or after the biopsy.

How to Prepare for the Test

If the biopsy is in the nose or another surface that is open or can be seen, no special preparation is needed. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to not eat or drink anything (fast) before the biopsy.

More preparation is needed for biopsies inside the body. For example, if you have a biopsy of the stomach, you should not eat anything for several hours before the procedure. If you are having a colonoscopy, a solution to clean your bowels is needed before the procedure.

Follow your provider's preparation instructions exactly.

Normal Results

Examination of the biopsy sample shows the polyp to be benign (not cancerous).

Risks

Risks include:

  • Bleeding
  • Hole (perforation) in organ
  • Infection

What Abnormal Results Mean

Cancer cells are present and may be a sign of a cancerous tumor. Further tests may be needed. Often, the polyp may need more treatment to ensure it is completely removed.

Why the Test is Performed

The test is done to determine if the growth is cancerous (malignant). The procedure may also be done to relieve symptoms, such as with the removal of nasal polyps.

Review Date: 1/15/2017
Reviewed By: Denis Hadjiliadis, MD, MHS, Paul F. Harron Jr. Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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