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Parathyroid adenoma

Hyperparathyroidism - parathryoid adenoma; Overactive parathyroid gland - parathyroid adenoma

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Causes

The parathyroid glands in the neck help control calcium use and removal by the body. They do this by producing parathyroid hormone, or PTH. PTH helps control calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D levels in the blood and is important for healthy bones.

Parathyroid adenoma can be due to a genetic problem. It may also be caused by radiation to the neck or taking the drug lithium.

Women over age 60 have the highest risk for developing this condition. Radiation to the head or neck also increases risk.

Definition

A parathyroid adenoma is a noncancerous (benign) tumor of the parathyroid glands. The parathyroid glands are located in the neck, near or attached to the back side of the thyroid gland.

Exams and Tests

Blood tests may be done to check levels of:

A 24-hour urine test may be done to check for increased calcium in the urine.

Other tests include:

  • Bone density exam
  • Kidney ultrasound or CT scan (may show kidney stones)
  • Kidney x-rays (may show kidney stones)
  • MRI
  • Neck ultrasound
  • Sestamibi neck scan (to check for swelling of the parathyroid glands)

Outlook (Prognosis)

When treated, outlook is generally good.

Possible Complications

Osteoporosis and the increased risk for bone fractures is the most common concern.

Other complications are less common, but may include:

Complications from surgery include:

  • Damage to a nerve that controls your voice
  • Damage to the parathyroid glands, which causes hypoparathyroidism (lack of enough parathyroid hormone) and low calcium level

Symptoms

Many people have no symptoms. The condition is often discovered when blood tests are done for another medical reason.

Parathyroid adenomas are the most common cause of hyperparathyroidism (overactive parathyroid glands), which leads to an increased blood calcium level. Symptoms may include any of the following:

  • Confusion
  • Constipation
  • Lack of energy (lethargy)
  • Muscle pain
  • Nausea or decreased appetite
  • Urinating more often at night
  • Weak bones or fractures

Treatment

Surgery is the most common treatment, and it often cures the condition. But, some people choose to only have regular checkups with their health care provider if the condition is mild.

To help improve the condition, your provider may ask you to stop taking calcium and vitamin D supplements. Women who have gone through menopause may want to discuss treatment with estrogen.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if you have symptoms of this condition.

Review Date: 5/2/2016
Reviewed By: Brent Wisse, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Nutrition, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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